Attorney Beth Collis quoted in Medscape article on Medical Board investigations

Attorney Beth Collis, of Collis Law Group LLC, was quoted in a Medscape article titled “The Dangers of a Medical Board Investigation: How to Protect Yourself”. In the article Ms. Collis addresses the 9,000 complaints that the State Medical Board of Ohio receives each year. “Many are minor or frivolous, such as allegations that the doctor or his staff was rude to the patient or family, billing questions, being forced to wait too long for an appointment, etc. The Board generally doesn’t take action in these cases and may not even inform the doctor of them.”

Ms. Collis also addresses how it is necessary for physicians to respond to Board investigations or inquiries. Ms. Collis warns physicians against ignoring inquiries from the Board, or from talking to the Board without counsel. “No complaint is too minor. Too many physicians think they don’t need a lawyer and can just talk the Board investigators into dropping the complaint. Doctors may sincerely want to help but they don’t understand the rules and pitfalls. They are often too chatty and explain things that weren’t even asked.” Legal counsel is recommended for any physician in connection with any Medical Board investigation or disciplinary action.

Read the article, written by Mark Crane, by clicking on the following link: https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/899247_2

As always, if you have any questions about this blog or the State Medical Board of Ohio, please feel free to contact one of the attorneys at Collis Law Group LLC at (614) 486-3909 or email me at Beth@collislaw.com.

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Ohio Physicians…Emeritus registration is an honorable and practical status following your retirement from the practice of medicine in Ohio.

Many physicians struggle with retirement. Many physicians envision practicing medicine until the day they die because they view medicine not only as their job, but as their way of life, identity, and calling.

I am aware of physicians who have lived outside Ohio or have not practiced in Ohio for many years who nevertheless continue to maintain an active Ohio medical license. However, to maintain an active medical license in Ohio, a physician must keep up to date with costly continuing education hours and renewals, and other legal and administrative requirements, the failure of any of which to adhere to could subject the physician to costly and stressful investigation and/or discipline by the State Medical Board of Ohio (“Board”). Additionally, even if a physician voluntarily allows their Ohio medical license to expire or lapse, the Board retains the legal right to institute a disciplinary action against the physician’s Ohio medical license for violation of certain laws or rules.

There is a simple way to avoid these problems. Under Board administrative rule 4731-22, a physician licensed to practice medicine and surgery in Ohio for at least ten years who declares that he or she is retired from active practice may apply to the Board for emeritus registration. For purposes of emeritus registration, “retired” is a status that means an individual has no active license in another state, or agrees in the emeritus application that he or she will not apply for renewal or reinstatement of any license held in another state. The physician may apply for emeritus registration by indicating on his or her biennial registration form or in written correspondence to the Board if he or she is in fact retired from active practice of medicine and surgery. To be eligible for emeritus status, the physician must also not have been the subject of disciplinary action in Ohio resulting in the revocation, suspension, probation, reprimand, or any other limitation of the physician’s license to practice.

Emeritus registration is not a license to engage in the practice of medicine and surgery and emeritus registrants may not engage in, or hold themselves out to others as actively engaged in, the practice of medicine and surgery. However, emeritus registrants may refer to themselves as doctor, if previously licensed to practice medicine and surgery.

Additionally, emeritus registrants are not required to comply with the Board’s continuing education requirements and also are exempt from renewal and renewal fees.

An emeritus registrant may apply to change back to active practice under conditions specified in the Board’s rules.

Emeritus registration is also available for practitioners licensed to practice osteopathic medicine and surgery, podiatric medicine and surgery, massage therapy, or cosmetic therapy in Ohio.

Be proactive. If you are ready to retire from the active practice of medicine and surgery in Ohio, consider applying for emeritus registration. Emeritus registration offers an honorable and practical status for a physician retiring from the active practice of medicine and surgery.

As always, if you have any questions about this post or the State Medical Board of Ohio in general, please feel free to contact me at Beth@collislaw.com or 614-486-3909 or check out our firm website at www.collislaw.com.